All excessively we hear of natural things being eliminated to make way for man-made structures. Luckily, this report out of Japan details just the opposite. North of Osaka, an odd train station was in fact built to support a large camphor tree that comes out from its center.

The Kayashima Station is basically younger than the Big Kusu Tree of Kayashima, as it’s generally recognized in Japan. Although the station was built in 1910, specialists estimate that the expansive tree is at the very least 700-years-old.

During the time the station was built, the camphor tree was standing directly to the right of the building. On the other hand, an increase in inhabitants and station overcrowding in the 1970s intended that Kayashima Station was in anxious need of enlargement. And while preliminary plans basically called for the elimination of the tree, this caused a local uproar.

Kayashima Station in 1968

As it was long related with a regional deity and shrine, the camphor tree was significantly respected by residents. Its elimination triggered a public outcry and tales started to spread of people who were harmed by daring to touch the sacred tree. For example, someone who cut off a branch developed a high fever afterward in the day. A white snake, which is linked with many Shinto deities, was identified covered around the tree. Even smoke was said to rise from the branches.

Taking all factors into consideration, authorities capitulated and drew up new plans to integrate the camphor in the train station’s architecture. When eventually complete in 1980, successful residents erected a small shrine at the base of the tree and Kayashima Station now advantages from its unique architecture.

Japanese Train Station Protectively Built Around a 700-Year-Old Tree

Japanese Train Station Protectively Built Around a 700-Year-Old Tree

Japanese Train Station Protectively Built Around a 700-Year-Old Tree

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